Previously "Diary of a Birding Medic"

Previously "Rugby Birder"

Sunday, 5 May 2013

A Non-Birding Tale of Woe

Once upon a time in ambulance land, a solo RRV responder was sent to standby in a city that he hates with a passion. Carefully hiding himself behind an electricity sub-station, he hoped that he would go undetected. Wrong! Thanks to our considerate colleagues at the end of the excellent and proven 111 system, a job was found for me and off I went. Arriving at the job, I assessed and arranged for an ambulance to take my patient to hospital for further investigation. This was achieved and my colleagues, Michael and Andy soon had the patient down the stairs, chaired and blanketed and ready for the off. It was then, that this hapless RRV responder decided to place his heavy responder bag on his back and cardiac monitor in hand, and start the descent of the stairs. It was not his day. After two steps he slipped, causing his left leg to buckle underneath him at a rather unnatural angle, and with heavy bag crumpled to the ground. The pain was excruciating. I could not move. I felt sick. I may have said a few choice words! I knew, at this early stage that all was not well and this hapless RRV responder was going to end his shift earlier than planned! A crew was rapidly responded to my aid with a cheery Ryan, Czes, Steve and puppy paramedic Grace. My pride was in tatters as very quickly were my trousers as my intrepid rescuers investigated the state of my left leg. Entonox (gas & air) was offered and I was happy to receive it. Ryan was desperately attempting to get me to have morphine, but I declined his kind offer. It was soon clear that I was not going to be able to walk and an ambulance chair was fetched, ably driven by Czes, giving me a white knuckle ride to the ambulance. I have to say that this was the first time I have travelled in an ambulance as a patient! Arriving at Walsgrave Hospital, I had the embarrassment of being wheeled into triage with colleagues watching. I was soon transferred to minors where I confidently told the doctor that my injuries were muscular and not bony - thankfully he agreed. With some strong pain relief, I was assessed. I could not straight leg raise or weight bare at this time, but bony injury and tendon damage was soon ruled out. It was severe muscle damage with pain from hip to knee. The doctor wanted me to have crutches but I politely declined as I could not face any further embarrassment! I was discharged after a couple of hours but wondered if the crutches should have been accepted as my leg keeps giving way, much to the amusement of the hospital staff. With trouser legs flapping, hairy legs exposed and an unsteady gait, I was discharged home with strict instructions to rest for a week.

I would like to thank all the staff involved for their efforts. It could have been much worse, that it was not, I am truly thankful.

9 comments:

holdingmoments said...

Expert help when needed Kevin. Hope all is well, or quickly on the mend now.

We have the best emergency services in the world. I can vouch for that personally, after the amazing treatment I had 3 years ago when I had a big heart attack.
A shame our governments don't see it that way.

Mike Attwood said...

Best bird story I've ever heard Frank reminds me of my days on tha ambulance service. Wish you well.

Mike Attwood said...

Sorry Kevin, I was being frank.

Kevin Groocock said...

Thanks Keith. Feeling much better thanks to good pain relief but probably wont be properly mobile for a at least a week (or so!). Glad you had good care with your AMI.

Kevin Groocock said...

Cheers Mike. It was not my ideal way of ending my shift!

Chris O'CALLAGHAN said...

I had a similar experience a few weeks ago. I was at the foot end of a chair carrying a very heavy patient when I stepped on to a lawnmower grass collector. Like yours, the sudden jolt of pain was sobering. We managed to ease the patient down the last two steps. My colleague; Neil Perks, had cleared the rest of the stairs of obstacles but was unable to find somewhere for the gardening implements at the foot of the stairs. He had made a mental note to alert me to the danger. However, his brain leaked and I trod on to the offending obstacle. Thankfully, it was just a minor displacement and I recovered within my days off. The first night was a restless one though I did get to sleep through exhaustion. When I woke the pain was considerably less so the displacement must have corrected itself during sleep. Anyway, here's hoping for your speedy recovery for leisurely pursuit.

Kevin Groocock said...

Cheers Chris. Stairs, chairs and patients are a dangerous combination!
Hopefully recovery will not be longer than a week.

ShySongbird said...

Oww and ouch! A 'bad day at the office', it sounded horrible Kevin. So sorry to read what happened. I felt I was there with you and could picture it all! I was convinced you'd broken something...which proves you're the expert and definitely not me ;-) I hope you are fully fit before too long.

Love the photos on the previous post and very envious about the Nightingale. Well done on the earlier Woodchat Shrike too!

Kevin Groocock said...

Many thanks Jan - it was a most unpleasant experience! I may be out of action for some time as often soft tissue injuries take as long to heal as fractures. At the moment I am frustrated as I can't really do much more than hobble around the house!